To Kill a Mockingbird Book Club Discussion – Day 2

Good morning everyone and welcome back to our book club discussion of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. To join in the conversation, simply leave a comment here with your thoughts and opinions about today’s discussion questions. If you haven’t had a chance to respond to yesterday’s post, you can check it out here.

Today’s discussion questions are:

  1. What are your thoughts on To Kill a Mockingbird and how it deals with race?
  2. Do you think that the lessons TKAM has to teach about race, justice, and standing up for what is right are as relevant to life in America now as it was in the 50’s when it was published or in the 30’s when the story takes place?

Tomorrow is one of our scheduled catch-up days so I won’t be posting any new discussion questions until Saturday. Hopefully, that will give everyone a chance to comment and have fun chatting about the book without feeling rushed.  Enjoy!

 

Share this on:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on Tumblr

6 Responses to To Kill a Mockingbird Book Club Discussion – Day 2

  1. I feel that to kill a mockingbird does a great job with dealing with race. It really shows the underbelly of how people can treat one another so differently over something so small as the color of their skin. I think that this book is still very relevant in today’s culture sadly. I wish that race was not such an issue still today but hopefully people will continue to read this book and change their opinions on the matter.

  2. What are your thoughts on To Kill a Mockingbird and how it deals with race?

    To me it deals with race as it was at the time. Even as a kid I was exposed to racism pretty heavily but as a kid you don’t quite grasp the concept You don’t understand why it was ok to play with some kids and not with others. As we got older it started to become a part of our reality and sadly I’ll admit until I was 16 I was racist until I saw what re-telling my fathers “black” jokes did to a fellow student. I never thought I would see that much pain in someone’s eyes, and realize I had caused that. My eyes were ripped open to that aspects of the reality of life

    Do you think that the lessons TKAM has to teach about race, justice, and standing up for what is right are as relevant to life in America now as it was in the 50’s when it was published or in the 30’s when the story takes place?
    Its relevance is poignant today as it was in its time. Even more so today because I want to believe we are so close to getting past racism if we truly try but then somebody stupid in the news proves me wrong but that doesn’t mean we should quit.

    • Thank you, Mike, for sharing that story. It’s hard to realize how the things we say and do impact others sometimes. That’s why Atticus’ advice to not judge anyone until you can walk around in their shoes is so important and it sounds as if you were able to do just that.

  3. Keeping this short, but there is something I noticed. Atticus Finch, while he believes blacks need equal justice, doesn’t really consider negroes to be equals, just that they need to be treated well in their place.

    • I can’t say that I agree, Rob. If Attitus seems a little paternal towards any of the black characters in the book, I think it’s more a result of education and position than it is of race. The reason I think this is the way he treats Calpurnia. Calpurnia is well spoken and educated and he treats her with the same courtesy and respect that he gives his sister, Alexandra, and in fact, upholds Cal’s authority and position even when it clashes with Alexandra. I think what you are seeing is a sort of caste system that Maycomb has based on family and social standing and that Atticus treats the Robinson family with the same level of respect that he treats the Cunninghams. Just my thoughts.

  4. Hi everyone. Sorry that I have fallen so behind on my commenting. My tendinitis has been flaring up and it makes it hard to type.

    As for the discussion question….

    If you had asked me a couple of years ago about the state of race relations in this country, I would have told you that I thought that obvious displays of racism just weren’t the norm anymore. That, while individuals might have their backwards opinions and personal prejudices, society had evolved to the point where it wouldn’t be tolerated for them to act on them in any obvious manner. Did I think that racism was totally gone? No. But I thought we were at the point of dealing with micro-aggression and thoughtless stupidity more than rampant, out in the open racism.

    But now I know that I was wrong. There are obviously huge racial issues in our country and the work of ending racism is far from over. I read about young African American men being killed by law enforcement and I read about police and first responders being ambushed and killed and it seems that the we are in such a vicious cycle of action and reaction and violence keeps escalating.

    I don’t know if a single book – even one as great as To Kill a Mockingbird – can really address all of the racial issues in our country. Hell, Mockingbird couldn’t even solve the racial issues in its own pages. But I do think that Mockingbird teaches us compassion, empathy, and a desire to protect the innocent and those lessons can only help as we try to heal and evolve.

Leave a reply